CUPERTINO, CA. – Apple’s Safari will take advantage later this year of new encryption technology that protects an important type of network communication called DNS. It’s part of a broader movement to build privacy into internet technology like email and the web that initially sent sensitive data unprotected.

DNS, short for Domain Name System, looks up the numeric internet addresses needed to communicate with online sites we know by human-readable names like cnet.com or wikipedia.org. Loading a website, checking email and many other online activities perform many DNS lookups, but typically they’re not protected with encryption.

Chrome and Firefox add that protection with a standard called DOH, or “DNS over HTTPS.” Apple is embracing the same technology but is enabling it with the operating system, not the browser. And Apple also is offering a related encryption approach called DOT, which uses DNS over TLS, the encryption standard underlying the HTTPS technology for website security.

To read more, click on https://www.cnet.com/news/safari-gets-new-encryption-option-for-network-privacy-on-iphones-macs/